Lowndes – Echols Ag News

Row Crop Weed Production Meeting

We will be having our last production meeting on March 8th at noon. Dr. Eric Prostko, extension weed specialist, will be speaking about row crop weed control. Please call the office to RSVP.

Georgia Peanut Farm Show

The Georgia Peanut Farm Show and Conference will be held in Tifton next Thursday, January 19th. Show opens at 8:30. There will be vendors set up and also educational sessions.

Lowndes County Peanut Production Meeting

Lowndes County Peanut Production Meeting is scheduled for Tuesday, January 10th at noon. Dr. Monfort and Dr. Abney will be talking about peanut production and insects.Commercial (cat. 21), and private pesticide credit will be given with each meeting to all license holders who attend and sign in.  Please call the office (333-5185) a few days ahead if you plan to attend so that plans can be made for the meal. I look forward to working with you this year and please contact me if you need anything.

2017 Production Meetings

Five row crop and vegetable production meetings are currently scheduled in Lowndes County. Commercial (cat. 21), and private pesticide credit will be given with each meeting to all license holders who attend and sign in.  Please call the office (333-5185) a few days ahead if you plan to attend so that plans can be made for the meal. I look forward to working with you this year and please contact me if you need anything.

Don’t let your license expire put these meetings on your calendar now.

  • January 10, 2017 Peanut Production andPeanut Insects
    12:00 noon Lowndes Extension Office
    Dr. Scott Monfort
    Dr. Mark Abney
  • January 13, 2017 Vegetable Production
    9:30 a.m. 4-H Center-Lake Park
    Dr. Stormy Sparks
    Dr. Tim Coolong
    Dr. Bhabesh Dutta
  • February 6, 2017 Row Crop Disease and Fertility
    12:00 noon Lowndes Extension Office
    Dr. Glen Harris
    Dr. Bob Kemerait
  • March 2, 2017 Cotton Production Cotton Insect
    6:00 pm Lowndes Extension Office
    Dr. Jarod Whitaker
    Dr. Phillip Roberts
  • March 8, 2017 Row Crop Weed Control
    12:00 noon Lowndes Extension Office
    Dr. Eric Prostko

Outstanding Georgia Young Peanut Farmer Award Nominations

From the Georgia Peanut Commission:

Nominations are now open for the Outstanding Georgia Young Peanut Farmer. The state winner will be announced at the Georgia Peanut Farm Show on Thursday, Jan. 19, 2017, in Tifton, Georgia. The award is sponsored by the Georgia Peanut Commission and BASF.The Outstanding Georgia Young Peanut Farmer Award is based upon the applicant’s overall farm operation; environmental and stewardship practices; and leadership, civic, church, and community service activities. “We have so many young peanut farmers making a difference in their communities and I consider this awards program a great opportunity to recognize one young peanut farmer for their contributions to the agriculture industry,” says Armond Morris, chairman of the Georgia Peanut Commission.

The award is open for any active Georgia peanut farmer who is not over 45 years of age, as of Jan. 19, 2017. An individual may receive the award only once. There is no limit on the number of applicants from each county in Georgia.

“BASF is honored to be a sponsor of the Outstanding Georgia Young Peanut Farmer Award,” says Dan Watts, District manager of BASF Crop Protection Products. “We are committed to agriculture and bringing new innovative solutions to producers that will allow them to continue to be successful.”

Applications are due to the GPC office by Tuesday, Dec. 15, 2016. The award application is available online at www.gapeanuts.com or by contacting Joy Crosby at 229-386-3690 or joycrosby@gapeanuts.com.

Previous Georgia winners include Trey Dunaway of Hawkinsville, Andrew Grimes of Tifton, Randy Branch of Baxley, James Hitchcock Jr. of Tennille, Brad Thompson of Donalsonville, Greg Mims of Donalsonville, Jim Waters of Blackshear and Jimmy Webb of Leary, Georgia. The award winner receives registration and hotel accommodations to attend the Southern Peanut Growers Conference in July and a sign to display at his or her farm.

Important Time to Check Peanuts

I attended a Peanut Maturity Clinic yesterday in Tifton. Our peanut agronomist stressed that checking fields this year will be important. Some fields, especially dryland, are running early while others are on time or running late. We had our first sample come into the office Wednesday. The peanuts are around 120 days old and they could dig starting next week. Things to consider when starting to dig are looking at how the peanuts are doing inside the shell, are the vines healthy and what does the weather looks like in the future.

maturity board

The picture above is the sample that was brought in. Judging by this sample there are not many peanuts on the back end so it is important not to miss any on the front end. After cracking some open, the peanuts are developing oil spots and look good.

Below are some tips on taking a sample and talking about maturity for different varieties shared by another county agent.

SAMPLING PROCEDURES FOR HULL SCRAPE

Carefully lift at least 5 plants from a minimum of three representative areas in a field.  DIG IN THE AREA WHERE THE PLANTS WERE LIFTED AND CHECK FOR ANY PEANUTS THAT COME OFF.  If you find some older mature pods in the soil bring these with the sample.  The pro­jected digging date is only as accurate as the sample used to represent the field.  Once the plants are collected in the field, approximately 200 to 220 nuts should be picked off individual plants for the actual hull scrape sample.  This sample will be pressure blasted and checked on the peanut maturity profile board.Each field should be sampled at approximately 115-120 days after planting.  A second sample should be run approximately 10 days before the date predicted by the first check to determine if the peanuts are maturing normally.  This process has proven to be an effective and reliable meth­od to project up to two weeks in advance the optimum digging date for peanuts.

WHEN TO DIG?

In general, the most reliable profiles for projecting the optimum harvest interval are those profiles taken 2-3 weeks before harvest and before the leading pods have reached the final stages of the black maturity class.  For medium maturity runner varieties (Georgia-06G and others), this may be achieved by taking an initial profile between 115-120 days after planting.  These profiles should prove best for ranking fields, and follow-up should be used to verify that maturation is proceeding normally.  Twin-row peanuts will frequently yield a greater percentage of early-set pods. These pods will be reflected in the profile, and may give a slightly premature indication of optimum maturity in some instances.  Pay particular attention to health of the pod stems on those reproductive sites having the earliest set pods, as well as days of age.  Rarely have we seen a medium maturity runner crop at risk from maturity loss in less than 125 days after planting.

 

Peanut Maturity Range**

Medium Medium-Late
Georgia-06G               TUFRunner ‘297’ Georgia-12Y
Georgia Greener              TUFRunner ‘511’ Georgia-13M
Georgia-098                TUFRunner ‘727’ Georgia -14N
FloRun ‘107’                        Tifguard Florida-07
FloRun ‘157’

**Range  may vary depending on planting date, rainfall, soil temperature, and other factors even for the same variety in a

 

 

Cotton Defoliation

Before we know it, it will be time to defoliate cotton. I attended a defoliation meeting Wednesday where Jared Whitaker, UGA cotton agronomist, spoke about different methods and chemicals used for defoliation. Some methods to determine when to defoliate include looking to see if 60 to 70% of bolls are open(we tend to wait for higher percentage to defoliate), sharp knife method and nodes above cracked boll. Attached are handouts that were given out at the meeting. If you have any questions, feel free to call the office. Also don’t forget we are scraping peanuts for maturity if you would like to take advantage of that service we provide.

defoliation handout jpeg_Page_1 defoliation handout jpeg_Page_2 defoliation handout jpeg_Page_3 defoliation handout jpeg_Page_4 defoliation handout jpeg_Page_5

Unique Find in Soybean Field

A citizen mentioned to us about how she was having a bad snail problem in her subdivision and how it was only the houses bordering a soybean field. So we went and visited the field and there were snails on the plants. On one leaf we found 3 snails. They were inside the canopy and on the outside foliage. Dr. Roberts, UGA Extension Entomologist, said there is not a good control that is economical for a row crop field and he has never seen them reach the threshold to treat for them.

IMG_0122 IMG_2535 IMG_2537

Peanut Maturity Testing

It won’t be long before peanut harvesting will begin. Our office will be providing peanut hull scraping for any peanut grower. When bringing in a sample, we prefer vines to be brought in along with the peanuts so we can check the health of the vines.  When picking samples, take 5 or 6 adjacent plants from two or three spots in the field.  If the field changes soil types or has some dry land spots, then separate samples should be taken. A sample needs to have between 180-220 pods to show a good representation. Call the office if you have any questions.

pnutmaturity board