Bulloch County Extension

Managing Mistletoe in Trees

This is an excerpt from American Mistletoe Infection in Trees by Kim Coder, Professor of Tree Health Care, University of Georgia. There are currently three mistletoe elimination interventions, each delivering varying results. The three interventions are pruning infected tree branches, shoot pruning of mistletoe, and/or using a labeled chemical spray…
Read More

Prolong the life of Poinsettias

The colorful bracts of poinsettias may stay bright for months if you care for them properly. Bright, indirect light and frequent watering are essential. Don’t allow the plants to wilt, but watering too often can damage roots. Poinsettias thrive on indirect, natural daylight — at least six hours a day….
Read More

Protect Ornamentals from Cold Temperatures

November 2014 was one of the top five coldest Novembers on record for many weather stations across Georgia.  The three-month outlook for December through February continues to show the signs of an El Nino, which will bring cooler and wetter conditions to south Georgia through the winter months.  Cold damage to ornamental plants…
Read More

Why is the pecan nut size so small this year?

Dr. Lenny Wells, Associate Professor and Extension Horticulture Specialist for pecans, discusses his theories on why the pecan nut size is smaller this year as compared to last. “Pecan harvest is well underway and the most consistent observation regarding the 2014 pecan crop is small nut size. The effect of various…
Read More

“Rattlesnake weed” causes lawn owners headaches

Florida betony (Stachys floridana) (also called rattlesnake weed and hedge nettle) is a problem weed in both turfgrasses and ornamentals. Florida betony is a “winter” perennial and, like most plants in the mint (Labiatae) family, has a square stem with opposite leaves. Flowers are usually pink and have the classic mint-like structure….
Read More

Time to plant Spring flowering bulbs

Spring-flowering bulbs have been on garden center shelves for weeks but the real season for planting them runs from late October to December. It’s best to wait to plant daffodil, tulip, hyacinth, Dutch iris, etc. until night temperatures are consistently below 60 degrees. At that time the soil is warm enough to stimulate…
Read More

Now is the time to control fire ants

Original story by Sarah Lewis, student writer with the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences “April and September are good times to apply baits, once at the start of the season and toward the end to help control before they come back in the spring,” said Will Hudson, a professor with…
Read More

Page 5 of 6« First...23456